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5 Ways to Keep Your Blood Healthy

Want energy to spare? Looking to improve your well-being in every way? Then you need to keep your blood happy. Here are some ways to support superior blood health.

Eat an Iron-Rich Diet

Iron is a key component of hemoglobin, the substance that allows red blood cells to carry oxygen to your body’s cells.*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Iron is found in animal-based foods such as meat and seafood; plant sources include pumpkin and sunflower seeds, almonds, hazelnuts, lima beans, tomato puree and white potatoes.

Stay Hydrated

Drinking plenty of fresh, clean water throughout the day is good for your health in general, including your blood health. According to The Heart Foundation, dehydration reduces blood volume, which causes heart rate and blood pressure to rise. What’s more, “when you are dehydrated, your blood retains more sodium, thickening your blood and making it harder for your blood to circulate through your body.”

The Foundation recommends “drinking a glass of water first thing in the morning, a glass of water with each meal and a few more glasses of water throughout the day. Also drink proactively, especially before, during and after exercise, on long airplane flights and in hot weather.“

Spice Up Your Cooking

A number of spices contain components known to promote healthy blood circulation. For example, “research indicates that ingesting cayenne pepper increases circulation, improves blood vessel strength and reduces plaque buildup in your arteries,” says dietitian Jillian Kubala, RD. Cinnamon, ginger and turmeric are other spices known for supporting the circulatory system.*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

And while it isn’t a spice, garlic “is well known for its beneficial impact on circulation and heart health,” Kubala says.*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Brush Your Body

Dry brushing involves sweeping a natural stiff-bristled bath or shower brush over your body. Not only does this help exfoliate dry skin, it also promotes detoxification “by increasing blood circulation and promoting lymph flow/drainage,” says dermatologist Shilpi Khetarpal, MD of the Cleveland Clinic. Anything that reduces the amount of toxins in your body helps your blood.

To dry-brush your skin, start at your feet and work upwards, using long strokes on your legs and arms, and circular ones on your abdomen and lower back. (A brush with a long handle helps you get to hard-to-reach areas.) Brush daily just before showering.

Sip Some Dandelion Tea

Speaking of toxins: The liver plays a key role in toxin disposal, including cleaning toxins from the blood. Traditional herbalism has long prized the dandelion, dismissed by most people as a lawn weed, for its ability to support healthy liver function.*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. In addition, substances found in dandelions “help your liver filter potentially harmful chemicals out of your food,” according to the folks at WebMD.

You can brew dandelion tea using the dried leaves, flowers or root, or you can pick your own dandelions. If you go the DIY route, be sure to take plants from ground that hasn’t been treated with chemicals of any kind and to only use flowers with fresh yellow petals.

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**These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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